When Colours Play Your Brand

2 Apr, 2017 | 0 comments

Colour Branding
When it comes to branding, colours play a major part. Colours are the basic entity of branding, giving the brand a whole new perspective. Colours having different frequencies provide different visual effects. Colours are also associated with a variety of beliefs and customs throughout the world.

So, along with different visuals, it is also important to catch different lifestyles. There are several industries out there. And with business expertise in diversified fields, it is very important to understand the value of colour in making a brand. A chart of best-fit colours for respective industries is given below:

COLOURWHAT FOR
BLACKSYMBOLIZES: Power, Boldness, Elegance and Sophistication
Example: Addidas, Gucci, etc.
REDSYMBOLIZES: Hunger, Love, Excitement and Life
Example: CNN, KFC
YELLOWSYMBOLIZES: Happiness, Warmth, Innovation and Caution
Example: Shell, DHL
BLUESYMBOLIZES: Professionalism, Trust and loyalty
Example: Pfizer, IBM
GREENSYMBOLIZES: Nature, Harmony and Henewal
Example: Animal Planet, British Petroleum
PURPLESYMBOLIZES: Luxury, Celebration, Education and Royalty
Example: Yahoo, Cadbury
WHITESYNBOLIZES: Pure, Peaceful, Clean and Goodwill
Example: Adobe, FedEx
PINKSYMBOLIZES: Feminism, Innocence, Youth and Beauty
Example: Barbie
BROWNSYMBOLIZES: Reliable, Solid, Masculine, and Earthly Aura
Example: Crush Coffee, Coffee

Colours play an important role in giving your brand life. If you want to create a winning logo for your brand, play with colours, experiment with various shades and see which of them best represent

the essence of your company. Be sure not to forget the target audience and how they will relate to the colours in the logo design.

GEOGRAPHICAL IMPORTANCE OF COLOURS

Although we may not all see the same colour in the same way, the effects of culture on the meaning associated with marketing cues (such as colour) are critical in international marketing. If the meaning associated with a colour or

combination of colours is different across cultures it might be beneficial pursuing a customised strategy with respect to colour associated with the brand, packages, web page and so on.

  • Green- the colour represents ‘independence’ in Mexico, is forbidden in Indonesia. It is the ‘religious colour’ in Middle-East and green hats own by men in China is a taboo as it is indicative of their wives having committed adultery.
  • Study shows that East Asian groups made the greatest distinctions regarding the affective meaning of colours, whereas Latin American and North American Colours are subjective.
  • When a brand migrates into a new market, it is important to consider the cultural ramifications of your brand’s colour palette and make informed brand decisions to ensure that you are sending relevant brand messages to your new customers. Brands that fail to take cultural values into consideration before entering the global market can invite disaster.
  • A Japanese scooter brand trying to sell black scooter in India could only pick up sales when they introduced coloured scooters, as mothers in India would forbid their sons from buying the scooters as they associate black with inauspiciousness.

However, due to the ongoing globalisation, brands currently are finding themselves in ‘colour no-mans land’. This is because colours and symbols are being widely accepted cross-culturally, especially by younger consumers. Therefore, today, in lieu of a clear set of guiding principles, brands

must carefully consider the way they leverage their visual language iconography- especially their use of colour to ensure they are communicating the right messages to the right people wherever they are in the world.

When it comes to branding, colours play a major part. Colours are the basic entity of branding, giving the brand a whole new perspective. Colours having different frequencies provide different visual effects. Colours are also associated with a variety of beliefs and customs throughout the world. So, along with different visuals, it is also important to catch different lifestyles. There are several industries out there. And with business expertise in diversified fields, it is very important to understand the value of colour in making a brand. A chart of best-fit colours for respective industries is given below:

COLOURWHAT FOR
BLACKSYMBOLIZES: Power, Boldness, Elegance and Sophistication
Example: Addidas, Gucci, etc.
REDSYMBOLIZES: Hunger, Love, Excitement and Life
Example: CNN, KFC
YELLOWSYMBOLIZES: Happiness, Warmth, Innovation and Caution
Example: Shell, DHL
BLUESYMBOLIZES: Professionalism, Trust and loyalty
Example: Pfizer, IBM
GREENSYMBOLIZES: Nature, Harmony and Henewal
Example: Animal Planet, British Petroleum
PURPLESYMBOLIZES: Luxury, Celebration, Education and Royalty
Example: Yahoo, Cadbury
WHITESYNBOLIZES: Pure, Peaceful, Clean and Goodwill
Example: Adobe, FedEx
PINKSYMBOLIZES: Feminism, Innocence, Youth and Beauty
Example: Barbie
BROWNSYMBOLIZES: Reliable, Solid, Masculine, and Earthly Aura
Example: Crush Coffee, Coffee

Colours play an important role in giving your brand life. If you want to create a winning logo for your brand, play with colours, experiment with various shades and see which of them best represent the essence of your company. Be sure not to forget the target audience and how they will relate to the colours in the logo design.

GEOGRAPHICAL IMPORTANCE OF COLOURS

Although we may not all see the same colour in the same way, the effects of culture on the meaning associated with marketing cues (such as colour) are critical in international marketing. If the meaning associated with a colour or combination of colours is different across cultures it might be beneficial pursuing a customised strategy with respect to colour associated with the brand, packages, web page and so on.

  • Green- the colour represents ‘independence’ in Mexico, is forbidden in Indonesia. It is the ‘religious colour’ in Middle-East and green hats own by men in China is a taboo as it is indicative of their wives having committed adultery.
  • Study shows that East Asian groups made the greatest distinctions regarding the affective meaning of colours, whereas Latin American and North American Colours are subjective.
  • When a brand migrates into a new market, it is important to consider the cultural ramifications of your brand’s colour palette and make informed brand decisions to ensure that you are sending relevant brand messages to your new customers. Brands that fail to take cultural values into consideration before entering the global market can invite disaster.
  • A Japanese scooter brand trying to sell black scooter in India could only pick up sales when they introduced coloured scooters, as mothers in India would forbid their sons from buying the scooters as they associate black with inauspiciousness.

However, due to the ongoing globalisation, brands currently are finding themselves in ‘colour no-mans land’. This is because colours and symbols are being widely accepted cross-culturally, especially by younger consumers. Therefore, today, in lieu of a clear set of guiding principles, brands must carefully consider the way they leverage their visual language iconography- especially their use of colour to ensure they are communicating the right messages to the right people wherever they are in the world.